Rolls Royce Flying Lady

The Spirit of Ecstasy, also called “Emily”, “Silver Lady” or “Flying Lady”, was designed by English sculptor Charles Robinson Sykes and carries with it a story about secret passion between John Walter Edward Douglas-Scott-Montagu, (second Baron Montagu of Beaulieu after 1905, a pioneer of the automobile movement, and editor of The Car Illustrated magazine from 1902) and the model for the emblem, Eleanor Velasco Thornton. Eleanor (also known as Thorn) was the secretary of John Walter, who fell in love with her in 1902 when she worked for him on the aforesaid motoring magazine. Their secret love was to remain hidden, limited to their circle of friends, for more than a decade. The reason for the secrecy was Eleanor’s impoverished social and economic status, which was an obstacle to their love. On the other hand, Montagu was married to Lady Cecil Victoria Constance Kerr since 1889.

The very first Rolls-Royce motorcars did not feature radiator mascots; they simply carried the Rolls-Royce emblem. This was not sufficient for their customers who believed that such a prestigious vehicle as a Rolls-Royce motorcar should have its own luxurious mascot. By 1910 personal mascots had become the fashion of the day.

Malcolm Nicholls Limited (MNL) were approached to make a metalized version of this iconic statue. This was part of a project for a design student. MNL were supplied with scan data, this data could then be used for MNL’s 3D print machines, in this instance MNL produced a 3D model using their Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process, the model was then hand finished it by one of MNL’s highly skilled model maker to a perfect gloss, this model was then Metalized giving it that perfect silver effect.

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